PT/OT

Writing SMART Goals for Adaptive Equipment

May 28, 2018 by Margaret Rice, PT

_1MM7425When using adaptive equipment it is important to have high standards for goal writing and data collection. Adaptive equipment spans a huge range from gait trainers to pencil grips. How many times have you seen adaptive equipment that was recommended for a student not being used properly or to its full potential? It is important to establish SMART goals for adaptive equipment the moment it is put into use. These goals may not necessarily be IEP goals but they need to be written for data collection on whether the adaptive equipment is helping the student access the curriculum.

When writing a SMART goal that includes adaptive equipment, the therapist or teacher needs to ensure that the goal is:

S – SPECIFIC: what, why and how are you going to use the adaptive equipment

M – MEASURABLE: evidence that the goal will be achieved; i.e. data collection

A – ACHIEVABLE: goal needs to be challenging but reachable

R – RELEVANT: the goal should measure outcomes, not activities

T – TIME-BOUND: deadline that the goal needs to be achieved by

Here are some examples of writing SMART goals for adaptive equipment. Keep in mind that SMART goals that include adaptive equipment may not only be measuring the student’s abilities but also school staff’s abilities to provide assistance if needed.

STUDENT #1 EXAMPLE

Student #1 is able to use a gait trainer with close supervision. One of the student’s goals is to be able to use the gait trainer to occasionally walk during the school day. School staff and therapists will help to encourage the daily use of the gait trainer for functional mobility.

SMART Goal for Adaptive Equipment Student #1

By June 2018, using a gait trainer the student will walk in a class line with close supervision from the classroom to the cafeteria at lunchtime 100% of the time.

S – Specific:

WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO? The student will walk in a class line from the classroom to the cafeteria.

WHY ARE YOU GOING TO DO IT? To enable the student to walk with peers to the cafeteria.

HOW ARE YOU GOING TO DO IT? The student will use a gait trainer to walk with close supervision by the teacher, teacher assistant or aide 100% of the time by June 2018.

M – Measurable: This can be measured using observation skills and data collection every day the student walks to lunch at the cafeteria. There is one measurement – did the student use the gait trainer to walk to the cafeteria from the classroom, yes or no?

A – Achievable: Make sure the student has the skill set to accomplish the goal. Make sure that the school staff can provide the close supervision.

R – Relevant: Transitioning from the classroom to the cafeteria is a functional skill during the school day.

T – Time Bound: Student and staff will achieve the goal by June 2018.

STUDENT #2 EXAMPLE

Student #2 uses a wheelchair for mobility. In the classroom, math lessons begin with morning math meeting on the carpet. The student would like to be able to participate in morning math meeting on the carpet with peers instead of the wheelchair. The student requires moderate assistance to transfer from the wheelchair to an adapted chair on the carpet. School staff and therapists will help to encourage the daily use of the adapted chair during morning math meetings.

SMART Goal for Adaptive Equipment Student #2

GOAL: By June 2018, classroom staff will provide moderate assistance to transfer the student to the adapted chair during circle time to participate in morning math meetings 100% of the time.

S – Specific:

WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO? The student will use an adapted chair.

WHY ARE YOU GOING TO DO IT? To enable the student to participate in morning math meetings with peers on the carpet.

HOW ARE YOU GOING TO DO IT? Classroom staff will provide moderate assistance to transfer the student to an adapted chair 100% of the time during morning math meetings.

M – Measurable: Collect data on whether the student used the adapted chair during math meetings – yes or no?

A – Achievable: Make sure the student has the skill set to accomplish the goal. Does the student tolerate the adapted chair for the entire math meeting? Make sure that the school staff can assist with the transfer.

R – Relevant: Participating in morning math meeting sitting on the floor is part of the classroom routine.

T – Time Bound: Student and staff will achieve the goal by June 2018.

STUDENT #3 EXAMPLE

Student #3 uses a manual wheelchair for mobility throughout the school day. A mobile stander is available to use in the classroom. During collaborative literacy activities, students in the classroom work standing up and move from table to table. This student requires minimal assistance to transfer in and out of the mobile stander and can independently propel the stander. School staff and therapists will help to encourage the use of the mobile stander to participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners during literacy activities.

SMART Goal for Adaptive Equipment Student #3

GOAL: By June 2018, after the classroom staff provides minimal assistance to transfer the student to the mobile stander, the student will use the mobile stander to be upright and mobile during collaborative literacy activities 100% of the time.

S – Specific:

WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO DO? The student will use a mobile stander for collaborative literacy activities.

WHY ARE YOU GOING TO DO IT? To enable the student to participate in standing during group literacy activities with diverse partners.

HOW ARE YOU GOING TO DO IT? Classroom staff will provide minimal assistance to transfer the student to the mobile stander in order for the student to be upright and mobile during collaborative literacy activities 100% of the time.

M – Measurable: Collect data on whether the student used the mobile stander during collaborative literacy activities – yes or no?

A – Achievable: Make sure the student has the skill set to accomplish the goal. Does the student tolerate the mobile stander for the group literacy activities? Can the student steer and stop the mobile stander in the classroom? Make sure that the school staff can assist with the transfer.

R – Relevant: Being upright and mobile duringcollaborative literacy activities is part of the classroom routine.

T – Time Bound: Student and staff will achieve the goal by June 2018.

The original version of this article first appeared in Your Therapy Source.

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Reply by Lisa on May 29, 2018 at 11:45 AM
The first goal is great! The next two, describe something the staff is doing. This could easily be changed to say what the student will do with help from the staff. 2. The student will transfer to the adapted chair with moderated assistance from the staff... 3. The student will transfer from his wheel chair to the mobile stander...