Tips & Advice

Four Field-Tested Approaches For Toileting with the TRAM

April 11, 2017 by Lori Potts, PT

The Rifton TRAM is a remarkably simple solution for toilet transfers, ensuring safety and dignity for both clients and caregivers. Here are four approaches developed by clinicians in the field to accommodate different body types and impairments.

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Method 1

For client with good trunk tone and weak lower extremities

View Slideshow

an illustration of the Rifton TRAM used for transferring a client to a toilet

 

Method 2

For clients with moderate weight bearing ability and poor trunk tone

View Slideshow

an illustration of the Rifton TRAM used for transferring a client to a toilet

 

Method 3

For clients with poor tone of the shoulder and hip girdles (such as clients with muscular dystrophy)

View Slideshow

an illustration of the Rifton TRAM used for transferring a client to a toilet

 

Method 4

For clients with moderate trunk tone, shoulder integrity, weight bearing ability, and optimal body weight

View Slideshow

an illustration of the Rifton TRAM used for transferring a client to a toilet

Download the pdf of all TRAM Toileting methods

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Reply by Roseanne Adams on January 27, 2018 at 11:33 AM
Hi I am my adult sons primary caregiver. He is a C-4/5 quadriplegic, about 180 lbs., 5' 8". Would this work for him or does he have to have the ability to sit on the edge of the bed? His adjustable hospital bed sits him up, would that work? Thank you, Roseanne Adams p.s. do you have any equipment that quads can use? He needs some neck support.
Reply by Elena on January 29, 2018 at 9:35 AM
Hi Roseanne, The TRAM can transfer a person with the capability to sit at the edge of the bed. It does not have the functionality to reach an individual who is leaning against the back of a hospital bed, so they would have to pivot so their legs are over the edge of the bed. For a quad needing neck support, we do have the supine stander and some seating and toileting choices. Otherwise, all our equipment (gait trainers, standers etc) comes with some form of arm supports, so if an individual has the capability to brace their arms and shoulders on the arm supports, this does offer some degree of neck control as well.