Connie Johnson PT, DScPT

 Connie Johnson, PT, DScPTDr. Johnson works at Fairfax County Public Schools in Falls Church, VA and is an adjunct faculty member at the University of Maryland. She received her DScPT at the University Of Maryland and her entry level MSPT at Springfield College. She participated in the Leadership Education for Neurodevelopmental Disabilities Program (LEND) in Washington, DC. As a member of the APTA, Section on Pediatrics she serves on the Practice Committee and has participated in activities related to recommendations for revision of the APTA’s Guide to Physical Therapist Practice. She has published in the areas of physical activity for children with disabilities and use of the Guide to PT Practice. Her research interests include clinical decision making and promoting best practice amongst school based therapists.

PT/OT SMART Goal Writing Using Adapted Equipment to Enhance Participation in Activities January 29, 2013 by Connie Johnson, PT, DScPT
Goal writing is central for measuring outcomes, documenting the mobility performance of a child, and securing insurance funding and reimbursement. Good goal writing supports physical therapists’ practice by objectively quantifying functional performance and achievement. With the inception of the ICF model1, therapists can focus their interventions on activities and participation in functional...
PT/OT Exploring the Use of an iPad to Enhance Productivity November 20, 2012 by Connie Johnson, PT, DScPT
The iPad is a tool that has revolutionized how we access and use media in our lives. As a physical therapist, I have been using one for work for the last several years and have found it enormously helpful. Of course, there is a learning curve for anything and it was a little daunting to figure out how to make the iPad meet my needs. When I first got my iPad I sat down with a friend who got me started; now...
PT/OT Patient Transfer and Lifting Guidelines Implications for Pediatric Physical Therapists August 30, 2011 by Connie Johnson, PT, DScPT
  Techniques for lifting and transferring patients are among the most basic skills physical therapists learn. Many of us were taught that by use of appropriate body mechanics we could transfer patients safely and effectively without risk of injury to us or the patient.1 In reality, however, even physical therapists who are well trained in the biomechanics of lifting experience occupational...