News The "Adverse Birth Outcome" February 10, 2015 by Carmen Hinkey
I didn’t know Henry until this morning, but he’s been in my mind all day thanks to what his mother shared so honestly about having him. In case any of us need reminding, the Washington Post carried her beautiful reminder that they are children first, their potential to learn and meet milestones far more important than their disabilities.  And she takes it even farther: She is &ldquo...
News Found Today on the Web January 02, 2015 by Carmen Hinkey
Every time a major media source writes a serious story about the challenges faced by those with developmental disabilities we should be encouraged and reminded that our society has made strides in accessibility and acceptance.   Facilities like the Lee Specialty Clinic in Louisville Kentucky are to be commended for creating an environment where these challenges are more easily met and the DD...
Stories Down Syndrome in Ancient Art October 22, 2013 by Erna Albertz
Image copyright ©The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Image source: Art Resource, NY In preparing for a presentation on disability history I gave two weeks ago to Ministry of Health and Social Service officials in Russia, I stumbled across the research of John M. Starbuck, who examined the depiction of people with Down syndrome in ancient and medieval art. His entire paper is worth looking at but one...
PT/OT Safe Patient Handling and Movement: Effectively Using Gait Training Equipment August 27, 2013 by Lori Potts, PT
It is an exciting time in the field of rehabilitation. For people who have sustained a neurological injury such as a stroke, incomplete spinal cord injury or traumatic brain injury there is now hope for regaining the ability to ambulate and sometimes even achieving a full recovery. In the past, a neurological injury was viewed as irreversible, and rehabilitation was focused on helping patients adapt and...
PT/OT Compensation and Recovery September 18, 2012 by Gilbert Thomson, PT
Should PTs train for compensation or recovery? Clinicians today are debating whether interventions should focus on teaching whatever is required to accomplish a task (compensation) or promote the neuroplasticity needed to allow the task to be accomplished “normally” (recovery).There is a great dialogue on this topic posted on the Journal of Neurologic PT (JNPT) discussions page which I highly...
Tips & Advice Cerebral Palsy: Selected Resources April 15, 2012
Rifton invites you to browse the selections below to find educational and practical resources on Cerebral Palsy. Updated October 2016 Books:     Handling the Young Child with Cerebral Palsy at Home by Nancie R. Finnie This favorite resource...
Stories Brain Injury Recovery: one couple’s story March 20, 2012 by Elena Noble, MPT
I was privileged to interview David the other day. We conversed by email since his speech is affected. David and his wife Ashley are survivors: their six-week-old son Jayvas died suddenly in 2009; one year later, at a 2010 New Year’s Eve celebration, David had a choking accident resulting in an anoxic brain injury. He was in a coma for a month and a half. Coming out of the coma at a rehab hospital...
Evidence Based Practice Evidence Update: Autism in the News February 07, 2012 by Elena Noble, MPT
This evidence update is focused on autism. It is a topic that’s been in the news lately, and the Spring 2012 Pediatric Physical Therapy Journal features two great articles and one commentary on this subject which I summarize below. Additionally, it is timely for the Rifton autism chair which is now available. I have also included a remarkable (and provocative) ABC news video at the end which you...
Tips & Advice Teaching Children with Autism in the Classroom January 24, 2012 by Elena Noble, MPT
Contributed by: Denise Keene who has been a Special Ed teacher for 15 years. All children in special education classes are introduced to the same subjects that are taught in the regular class: math, reading, writing, science, etc. However, because they have different needs, new concepts may be introduced at a slower pace. For example, most children learn to read a short book by the end of kindergarten, but...
PT/OT Beyond the walker November 08, 2011 by Lori Potts, PT
Minnesota Clinic gets Better Outcomes from Smarter Gait Training than from Traditional Quad Walkers Contributed by Nicole Grant, PT Courage Center, Golden Valley, MN As a physical therapist here at Courage Center in Golden Valley, Minnesota, I see many adult patients with significant motor deficits. For gait training, traditional four-wheeled walkers and rolling platform walkers provide stability, but not...
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