Overground gait training

Tips & Advice New Video Tutorials on Using the Rifton TRAM November 19, 2013 by Clare Stober
As word of the Rifton TRAM continues to spread among therapists and caregivers we’ve recognized the need for a simple set of step-by-step tutorials to demonstrate the basic functions of this new transfer and mobility device. If you’ve recently acquired a TRAM or if you’re trying to decide whether it’s right for you or someone you’re caring for, take a few moments to watch...
Videos Seated Transfer: Rifton TRAM video 1
The Rifton TRAM combines three powerful functions in a single, compact, ultralight device: seated transfer, sit-to-stand lift, and gait training. This short step-by-step guide demonstrates how you can quickly and easily transfer your client in the seated position. Because the TRAM uses no sling, it’s ideal for toilet transfers.
Videos The Sit-to-Stand Lift and Gait Training: Rifton TRAM video 2
The Rifton TRAM combines three powerful functions in a single, compact, ultralight device: seated transfer, sit-to-stand lift, and gait training. This short step-by-step guide demonstrates how you can quickly and easily raise your client from the seated position to standing and then proceed to gait training or ambulation.
Videos Using the Forearm Supports: Rifton TRAM video 3
The Rifton TRAM combines three powerful functions in a single, compact, ultralight device: seated transfer, sit-to-stand lift, and gait training. This short clip shows how you can use the TRAM’s forearm supports to improve the transfer experience and give your client positioning support to improve gait posture.
Videos Using the Direction Locks: Rifton TRAM video 4
The Rifton TRAM combines three powerful functions in a single, compact, ultralight device: seated transfer, sit-to-stand lift, and gait training. This short clip shows how you can use the TRAM’s versatile direction locks to improve the TRAM’s handling particularly when gait training.
Videos Using the Scale for Weighing and Off-weighting: Rifton TRAM video 5
The Rifton TRAM combines three powerful functions in a single, compact, ultralight device: seated transfer, sit-to-stand lift, and gait training. This short clip shows how you can use the TRAM’s optional built-in scale to quickly weigh your client during the course of a routine transfer and also to measure how much weight your client is bearing during gait training and standing practice.
PT/OT Safe Patient Handling and Movement August 27, 2013 by Lori Potts, PT
It is an exciting time in the field of rehabilitation. For people who have sustained a neurological injury such as a stroke, incomplete spinal cord injury or traumatic brain injury there is now hope for regaining the ability to ambulate and sometimes even achieving a full recovery. In the past, a neurological injury was viewed as irreversible, and rehabilitation was focused on helping patients adapt and...
How To's Guidelines for Functional Use of the Pacer Gait Trainer part II
In the Pacer gait trainer children with a wide variety of disabilities can gain independent movement while provided with appropriate support. The Pacer accessories (we call them prompts) are infinitely adjustable to accommodate the individual needs of almost any person. Many people use the Pacer without fully appreciating the adjustments that are possible. Last week we took a closer look at the Pacer...
How To's Guidelines for Functional Use of the Pacer Gait Trainer part I
In the Pacer gait trainer children with a wide variety of disabilities can gain independent movement while provided with appropriate support. The Pacer accessories (we call them prompts) are infinitely adjustable to accommodate the individual needs of almost any person. Each prompt is also removable so as the client’s motor skills improve they can be removed. Many people use the Pacer without fully...
Stories Brain Injury Recovery: one couple’s story March 20, 2012 by Elena Noble, MPT
I was privileged to interview David the other day. We conversed by email since his speech is affected. David and his wife Ashley are survivors: their six-week-old son Jayvas died suddenly in 2009; one year later, at a 2010 New Year’s Eve celebration, David had a choking accident resulting in an anoxic brain injury. He was in a coma for a month and a half. Coming out of the coma at a rehab hospital,...
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