Neuro rehab

PT/OT Evidence Update: Supported Standing Protocols December 07, 2015 by Elena Noble, MPT
For decades already we’ve seen standing programs used as a therapeutic intervention for adults with neurological conditions. We’ve known that without such intervention, patients with spinal cord injuries, strokes, traumatic brain injuries or multiple sclerosis spend hours and hours each day in sedentary postures—with devastating results. Sitting for upwards of eight hours a day leads to...
News Spotlight on SCI Rehab September 18, 2015 by Elena Noble, MPT
By an act of Congress, September is Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Month. And well it should be: one person becomes paralyzed every 48 seconds—in the U.S. alone. Advancements in treatment continue today but we have a long way to go. To draw attention to the needs of SCI victims (and before September is gone) I’d like to tell about a recent visit I made to a fabulous clinic in Tampa.   Built...
Evidence Based Practice Evidence Update: Quicker Recovery with Early Movement July 13, 2015 by Elena Noble, MPT
A recent study at Cleveland Clinic, a leading rehabilitation provider, found that patients participating in early mobility routines after neurological injury recovered quicker and went home earlier than those receiving standard care. NPR recently ran an excellent segment on this study providing good detail and anecdotes from the researchers illustrating how early mobilization is improving the...
PT/OT Improved Rehab Intervention with the TRAM May 26, 2015 by Jackie Honeyfield, PT
The Rifton TRAM is a great addition to our skilled rehabilitation department, especially for those patients with neurological deficits. One therapist can safely assist a patient in the TRAM through a functional mobility progression starting with sitting balance on the edge of the bed, standing tolerance, posture and then gait normalization. In the past, many of these therapeutic activities needed multiple...
PT/OT The Rifton TRAM vs the Standard Four-Wheeled Walker December 02, 2014 by Elena Noble, MPT
For those of us concerned with rehab following central nervous system lesions, the last ten years have been exciting. There has been extensive research focused on the brain and its neuroplastic properties, and it’s changing the way we think about treatment. Specifically, recent research has encouraged gait rehabilitation—task-specific and repetitive. We all recognize now that ambulation...
Evidence Based Practice Three Principles of Neural Plasticity to Apply in Your Rehabilitation Practice December 03, 2013 by Gilbert Thomson, PT
There has been a great deal of interest in recent years in the study of plasticity in the nervous system. Plasticity simply means the capacity of the central nervous system to adapt and change. Changes in the structure and function of the nervous system accompany improvements in motor skills that happen with learning and with rehabilitation after neurological damage. Although much of the work on neural...
PT/OT Safe Patient Handling and Movement August 27, 2013 by Lori Potts, PT
It is an exciting time in the field of rehabilitation. For people who have sustained a neurological injury such as a stroke, incomplete spinal cord injury or traumatic brain injury there is now hope for regaining the ability to ambulate and sometimes even achieving a full recovery. In the past, a neurological injury was viewed as irreversible, and rehabilitation was focused on helping patients adapt and...
PT/OT Safe Patient Handling and Movement August 13, 2013 by Lori Potts, PT
Early Mobility in the ICU and the Role of Therapists Early mobility in the intensive care unit is a hot topic for therapists working in acute care. Recently, with help from the ICU nursing staff, therapists have been assisting patients out of bed and in exercise and mobility routines earlier during their recovery than previously thought possible. Why? Because a growing body of evidence is pointing to the...
PT/OT Safe Patient Handling and Mobility August 06, 2013 by Lori Potts, PT
Physical and occupational therapists, though keenly cognizant of ergonomic issues, are still at risk for work-related musculoskeletal injuries.1,2 In fact, therapists may be more susceptible than others to this type of injury considering the nature of their work, involving repetitive and sustained forces for soft tissue treatment and lifting and transferring patients.3 Even when using careful body...
PT/OT Compensation and Recovery September 18, 2012 by Gilbert Thomson, PT
Should PTs train for compensation or recovery? Clinicians today are debating whether interventions should focus on teaching whatever is required to accomplish a task (compensation) or promote the neuroplasticity needed to allow the task to be accomplished “normally” (recovery).There is a great dialogue on this topic posted on the Journal of Neurologic PT (JNPT) discussions page which I highly...
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