Videos

Adaptive Seat Angle Adjustments

Rifton Activity Chair Video 2

How do I adjust the seat angle on my Rifton Activity Chair? How does the tilt-in-space feature work? Can I tilt just the backrest forward? Sam Durgin, Rifton's lead designer, answers these questions and more in his short demonstration of the adaptive seat angle adjustments on the Rifton Activity Chair. A transcript is provided below for viewers with hearing disabilities.

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Transcript

[00:00:04.12] Caption: Tilt-in-Space.
R840 Standard 15° forward to 15° back
R850 Hi/Lo 15° forward to 25° back

[00:00:12.24] Sam Durgin: Ok, now I'll tell you about our tilt-in-space adjustment, and this is done with these two triggers here. I can tilt the chair back a full 25 degrees and 15 degrees forward. This is especially useful if you want to do a transfer to the floor, you are able to tilt the chair forward, fold the footboard back, and have a straight line vertically from the front edge of the seat right down to the floor. This is good for transfers. If you have a change of activity and you've just finished a mealtime, and want to have the child wash at a sink, we can bring the chair up to a sink, get it to the level you need, tilt it slightly forward, bring the armrests out of the way if they're in the way, and bring the footboard back if needed, and now the child can wash hands at the sink.

[00:01:16.09] Caption: Backrest Angle R840 Standard & R850 Hi/Lo 5° forward to 20° back

[00:01:21.10] Sam Durgin: Separate from the tilt-in-space adjustment, we have a backrest angle adjustment. And I can recline the backrest a full 20 degrees back, and forward by 5 degrees. This is true for both the hi/lo base and the standard base chair. With the backrest all the way reclined, we still can tilt the seat forward, tilt-in-space, this may be useful for children with hip contractures, to get them to functional sitting.

[00:01:57.01] Caption: Push Handles

[00:02:00.15] Sam Durgin: The push handles are an option, and they're very good for maneuvering the chair down hallways, or in the classroom. They're also very good for assisting with all the angle adjustments as a point of leverage. They have an adjustment point where I can raise and lower the push handle, or, if you'd rather not have it, you can remove them entirely. Personally, if you have a chair with wheels, I would recommend the push handles.