Developmental milestones

PT/OT Giving the Gift of Mobility April 25, 2016 by Denise Swensen, PT, DPT
Typically developing children reach most motor milestones in a fairly predictable manner. By six months babies are rolling; by eight months they are creeping on all fours and sitting on their own and by ten-twelve months they are standing and getting ready to take their first steps. During this part of the first year of life, typically developing babies are exploring their environment, interacting with...
PT/OT Adaptive Equipment for Classrooms Series: Part 1 of 3 February 29, 2016 by Gilbert Thomson, PT
This post is the first in a series of articles on the topic of adaptive equipment use in the classroom. Adaptive equipment, used appropriately, serves as a teaching tool for students to learn the motor skills of sitting, standing, and walking, while engaged in the curriculum. This post focuses on active sitting as a motor skill. Adaptive Equipment for Classrooms Series: Part 2 of 3 Adaptive Equipment for...
PT/OT Best Practices for Classroom Prompting February 15, 2016 by Margaret Rice, PT
When teaching children with special needs new skills, therapists and teachers typically provide prompts to guide the process. According to activity-based curriculums, prompts are defined as supports, and may come in many different forms. Prompts are ever changing, depending on the activity. A wide variety of prompts enables special education classroom staff to choose the one or combination that are most...
Stories Heads Up! February 20, 2015 by Lori Potts, PT
(Scroll down to see slides) Robert Welton Clement arrived on March 25, 2014, fourth son to the family of my sister Jean and her husband Reuel. The birth was unexpectedly difficult, and Robert arrived looking like he might not survive – might, in fact, already be no longer living. But his heartbeat was there, even though he was not breathing. Eighteen agonizing minutes of emergency intervention and...
Therapeutic Benefits Mobility Opportunities Via Education
The MOVE® program helps people with disabilities learn to sit, stand, walk and transition so they can participate more fully in family and community life. MOVE® is a stepped process that helps you assess your client’s ability and incrementally teach key motor skills. And it works.
Stories How the HTS is Changing Lives July 15, 2014 by Elena Noble, MPT
Since the recent launch of our newest product, the Hygiene and Toileting System (HTS), we’ve been hearing from many parents, teachers and therapists how this product has improved the toileting outcomes for children with disabilities. Here’s a great example from a special education teacher at a school on the west coast. “We love the HTS in our classroom. I have been using it with a...
Stories From the Dad of an Exceptional Graduate June 24, 2014 by Elena Noble, MPT
Dear Rifton – My son Alan is 18, and he has used Rifton devices most of his life. He learned to bear his own weight in the smallest-sized Mobile Stander, which we got for him on his first birthday. Slowly he progressed to walking, first with a Pacer gait  trainer, then holding two hands, one hand, and finally independently. During the last four years, most of Alan’s education has...
Tips & Advice Toilet Training a Child with Special Needs September 27, 2011 by Claire Keeler, RN, CPNP, CDE
Parents often find that toilet training their child can be a frustrating process. Some children may train quickly and easily, but for many children it can take time. And if a child has special needs, it can be even more difficult. Toilet training can often be stressful, even for children without special needs, but for every child it’s an important milestone. Toilet training increases a child’s...
PT/OT Toby Long on Activity Focused Early Intervention Part II January 31, 2011 by Lori Potts, PT
How does a therapist incorporate activity-based intervention into their practice? Toby: Actually, the therapist needs to think of it in the opposite way: How can they incorporate their practice into this approach? This requires creativity. We want to promote trunk and postural control. Where does the child need it? Where does the family want the child to demonstrate this? How can I provide ideas or...
PT/OT The ICF and People with Developmental Disabilities February 03, 2009 by Elena Noble, MPT
The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) has been developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a comprehensive framework in which to classify the varying aspects of a person’s disability and health. With the ICF, the focus is turned towards achieving the best possible activity and participation level in society despite the disability.  Recently...